Events

The Administrative Challenge of Managing a Professional Football League and National Team In a Small European Nation in the 21st Century: The Case of Wales

The Administrative Challenge of Managing a Professional Football League and National Team In a Small European Nation in the 21st Century:

The Case of Wales

Venue – Room 101 – Foster Court,
University College London
(Off Torrington Place WC1 opposite Waterstones Bookstore)

Wednesday 8th December, 6pm-8pm

Given by:

Alun Evans, Chairman, The League of Wales (The Welsh Premier) Member, Welsh FA Council

Synopsis

The perceived drift in power from national football associations, and their major international associations Uefa and Fifa, to the major clubs has been a staple of press commentary on the football industry over the last ten years. In Europe the most influential clubs have formed their own association – G14 – to assert their influence. Within the English game recent comments by Newcastle chairman Freddie Shepherd (see reading below) regarding the desirability of the Premier League taking over the Football League have provided an insight into the highly commercially-driven agenda of some Premier League chairmen and their very negative attitudes to the conventional competitive and regulatory structures of the game. This raises questions as to the strategic response the game’s traditional custodians and regulators, the national associations, should adopt in the face of this onslaught.

Alan Evans was the founder of League of Wales (now the Welsh Premier), and Chief Executive of the Welsh FA from 1982 to 1995. During that time he also sat on many FIFA and UEFA regulatory committees. He remains a member of the Welsh FA Council and is currently the Chairman of the League of Wales. His wide-ranging experience puts him in a unique position to assess how recent developments have affected the structure and nature of competition both at the national level in countries like Wales, and at international level in Europe’s main club competitions and in the European Nations’ Championship.

Alan will present the case that, while the traditional regulatory framework has been subjected to much criticism of late, it remains the most effective structure to both develop the game and protect and nurture the grass-roots which are essential for its long-term survival. He will also argue that while the traditional structures are quite capable of adapting to the more dynamic commercial environment which takes account of the financial demands of clubs, it is not at al clear that alternative `big-club’ driven structures might have the capability to protect the game’s grass-roots.

Reading

For more information

Sean Hamil
Football Governance Research Centre

E.mail: s.hamil@bbk.ac.uk

Tel: 020-7631 6763

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