Events

A “fit and proper person” test for football: protecting and regulating clubs

A “fit and proper person” test for football: protecting and regulating clubs

A seminar in Room 203 of the Clore Management Centre,
Birkbeck,
University of London,
Malet Street,
London WC1E 7HX

6 – 8 pm, Monday 12th May 2003

Given by:

Matthew Holt, Birkbeck, University of London

Synopsis

Following the collapse of ITV digital and the growing number of clubs in administration and financial danger, the regulation of the domestic game by the football authorities has come increasingly to the fore. Financial divides between leagues, a weakened regulatory framework, and the large personal gains to be made from football, have all focussed attention on the ability of the game’s authorities to govern effectively. Matthew will look specifically at the recommendation made by the Football Task Force, that the Football Association introduce a ‘fit and proper person’ requirement for those owning a substantial shareholding in football clubs in England. He will also focus on the wider regulatory context and assess the role of the authorities in promoting good governance look at the opportunities for progress.

Further Reading

  • Better Regulation Task Force (2000), Principles of Good Regulation, Cabinet Office, London.
  • Better Regulation Task Force (1999), Fit Person Criteria, Cabinet Office, London.
  • Brown A (2000), ‘Sneaking in Through the Backdoor? Media Company Interests and Dual Ownership of Clubs’ in Hamil et al. (eds), Football in the Digital Age: Whose Game Is It Anyway? Mainstream, Edinburgh.
  • Brown A (2000), ‘The Football Task Force and the Regulator Debate’ in Hamil et al. (eds), Football in the Digital Age: Whose Game is it Anyway? Mainstream, Edinburgh.
  • Cannon T and Hamil S (2000), ‘Reforming Football’s Boardrooms’, in Hamil et al. (eds), Football in the Digital Age: Whose Game is it Anyway? Mainstream, Edinburgh.
  • Conn D (1997), The Football Business, Mainstream, Edinburgh.
  • Coward N (2000), ‘Facing Football’s Future: The Task Force and Beyond’ in Hamil et al. (eds), Football in the Digital Age: Whose Game is it Anyway? Mainstream, Edinburgh.
  • The Football Association (2002), The Football Association Handbook, Season 2002-2003: Rules of the Association and the Laws of the Game, The Football Association, London.
  • Football Task Force (1999), Football: Commercial Issues: Report One, Department of Culture, Media and Sport, London.
  • Football Task Force (1999), Football: Commercial Issues: Report Two, Department of Culture, Media and Sport, London.
  • Hamil S, Michie J, Oughton C, Warby S (eds) (2000), Football in the Digital Age: Whose Game Is It Anyway? Mainstream, Edinburgh.
  • Hamil S, Michie J, Oughton C, Shailer L (2001), The State of the Game: The Corporate Governance of Football Clubs 2001, Football Governance Research Centre, Birkbeck, University of London
  • Horton E (1997), Moving the Goalposts: Football’s Exploitation, Mainstream, Edinburgh.
  • Independent Football Commission (2002) Annual Report: Pushing the Pace of Reform
  • Manning L (2000), ‘Football Club Balance Sheets: Fact or Fantasy’, in Hamil et al. (eds), Football in the Digital Age: Whose Game Is It Anyway? Mainstream, Edinburgh.
  • McArdle D (2000), From Boot Money to Bosman: Football Society and the Law, Cavendish, London
  • North S and Hodson P (1997), Build a Bonfire: How Football Fans United to Save Brighton and Hove Albion, Mainstream, Edinburgh.
  • Smith J (1997), Football: Its Values, Finances and Reputation, The Football Association, London.
  • Taylor R (2000), ‘Why Football Needs a Regulator’ in Hamil et al. (eds), Football in the Digital Age: Whose Game Is It Anyway? Mainstream, Edinburgh.
  • Toms N (2000), ‘Ownership and Control of Sports Clubs: The Manchester United Club Buyout’ in Greenfield and Osborn (eds), Law and Sport in Contemporary Society, Frank Cass, London.

 

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